Dog sledding

Posted on Saturday February 01, 2014 in Uncategorized


For my 32nd birthday this year Shannon booked us a weekend up north in an incredible B&B and some dog sledding. Winter always gets me a little down as it means I have to pack the motorcycle into storage. So to cheer me up we used husky power in place of horsepower, and boy was it fun.  It was interesting because on hill inclines you have to get off the sled and run behind. The dogs actually check if you’re helping or not and if you’re not, they get upset and stop.  We also got in some snowshoeing, relaxing, and I designed some new things in my sketchbook.  I’m an incredibly lucky guy to have such an amazing woman in my life.

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Leaving Matterform.

Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2014 in News

As of January 21st, 2014 my involvement and association with Matterform ended. I was an early adopter of 3D technology, and had one of the first 3D printers available to consumers. From there I moved on to making my own, and then co-founded Matterform to manufacture the first affordable consumer 3D scanner.

This project has taught me that I need the constant challenge of new projects and inventions, sometimes several at the same time.  Nothing excites me more than random packages of parts arriving each week - it’s better than Christmas morning.  Working on multiple inventions is what makes life an adventure, and worth jumping out of bed in the morning.

Unfortunately, over the past few months it became clear that my role as an prototyper and pragmatic inventor was no longer essential to Matterform, and it was time to leave.  It’s sad of course - it was my idea to create the scanner, and I designed the look of it as well as the electronics that ran it.  However, I’ve found that concentrating on sales figures, financial paperwork, etc. is not my passion or expertise, so it’s best left to those that enjoy it and do it well.

Now that the Scanner is in its final stages of mass production, I felt it was a good time to move on to new projects.  It’s been an incredible experience, and I’ve gained valuable knowledge that will serve me well in future endeavours. Since I like to build and assemble things myself, I’ve concluded that for now at least, perhaps I am better suited to a small, single owner business.

Thank you all for your confidence and kind words over the past 10 months.







This project has taught me that I need the constant challenge of new projects and inventions, sometimes several at the same time.  Nothing excites me more than random packages of parts arriving each week - it’s better than Christmas morning.  Working on multiple inventions is what makes life an adventure, and worth jumping out of bed in the morning.

Unfortunately, over the past few months it became clear that my role as an prototyper and pragmatic inventor was no longer essential to Matterform, and it was time to leave.  It’s sad of course - it was my idea to create the scanner, and I designed the look of it as well as the electronics that ran it.  However, I’ve found that concentrating on sales figures, financial paperwork, etc. is not my passion or expertise, so it’s best left to those that enjoy it and do it well.

Now that the Scanner is in its final stages of mass production, I felt it was a good time to move on to new projects.  It’s been an incredible experience, and I’ve gained valuable knowledge that will serve me well in future endeavours. Since I like to build and assemble things myself, I’ve concluded that for now at least, perhaps I am better suited to a small, single owner business.

 Thank you all for your confidence and kind words over the past 10 months.


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CES 2014.

Posted on Friday January 10, 2014 in Uncategorized




Every year I follow CES on Engadget and The Verge, so how excited was I to get to go there? Pretty darn excited. The process of being an exhibitor and talking about the 3D scanner was great. I won’t delve too much into that here, I wrote some posts for the company blog on that.

I’d rather talk about what the experience was personally like.  It’s huge!  I knew it was huge, but I really didn’t understand just how huge. There’s thousands of vendors, and while the websites make it look like everything there is exciting, you actually really have to sort through a lot of less than stellar stuff to try and find the good things.  As an exhibitor that’s difficult - you just don’t have the time; as press, I think you’d need a team or you’d miss half of it.

The sights were great. I don’t gamble, but after the show each day we explored the strip, saw the sharks at the aquarium, the wax museum, gondolas, volcano and fountain show.  We went to the mashable party and I met the guy that designed the talking trash cans and Alien Encounter for Disney World. Those were actually my 2 favourite things about Disney World when we went.. oh, almost 20 years ago, and I got to meet him, shake his hand and get the inside scoop on all those projects. How’d I meet him?  Because he wanted to talk to ME - he was impressed with the scanner’s design. That felt pretty good.

I also met Brian Heater of Engadget when he came over to blog about our 3D Scanner.  I met Anna from Make Magazine and Rose from TCT.  I met some toy designers from Hasbro.

Then when I was doing a circle I saw Brook Drumm of Printrbot (he didn’t have a booth, he was just sight-seeing) and hunted through the aisles to find him and pull him over to our booth.  I’d talked with him lots over email, so it was a real treat to chat with him for nearly an hour in person.  I also went to a couple of talks. One was by the CEO of Leapfrog (previous CEO  of Toys r Us) - I really enjoyed it.

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Canada Day - Sparkler bike.

Posted on Thursday August 01, 2013 in Uncategorized

For today's craft lesson, we’re going to attach sparklers to the spokes of a bicycle, light them, and then ride around for Canada Day.  Got it?  Here’s the video.  In the future I’d like to do it again and set an electronic fuse so I can light more of them at once.



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Sgi Octane2 case

Posted on Wednesday July 10, 2013 in Uncategorized


Whenever I go places and wear my SGI t-shirt I’m always surprised by how someone always recognizes it.  Whether it’s just mutual drooling (these were the computers that every animation house was using and every 3d animator was lusting for), or a story of someone that once worked there, it’s always interesting.  I bought an old busted Octane2 case recently. Originally, the Octane2 sold for around $25,000 for a base configuration and went up from there to $60,000.  This chassis cost me about $200 but honestly, if it worked it wouldn’t have been worth much more.  Oh how things change so quickly.  The machine is barely 10 years old.

Anyways, SGI systems still look incredible to my eye,  as they were something I could never afford.   I’m going to convert this one into an ATX system when I have time and put my core i7 inside it.  As far as I’m concerned this beats any boring normal case, while also screaming history.

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